Tag Archives: fire damage

What to do After the Wildfire

As residents of Aneheim Hills, Orange, and the Tustin areas start to make their way back home following Canyon Fire 2, it would be wise to take the time to read over this list of tips for what do after a wildfire. As always, SERVPRO of Tustin is #HereToHelp. Our owners are long time Tustin residents, and most of our staff lives either in or near the affected areas. We are happy that we are able to offer a lending hand to our neighbors during this trying time. If you have any further questions or concerns, our staff is ready to help – give us a call at 714-480-1340

 

After Wildfire Tips

• Do not open your windows or doors once work is started as there is still smoke in the air. Many think that “airing” out their home is helpful, however, there is still soot and fire debris in the air and if winds change direction your house can fill with smoke particles again.

• Do not open your windows or doors once work is started as there is still smoke in the air. Many think that “airing” out their home is helpful, however, there is still soot and fire debris in the air and if winds change direction your house can fill with smoke particles again.

• A slight smell after our cleaning of your home is normal and should dissipate after rain and other natural occurring factors like new plant growth on the burned areas. Ash and soot on the ground and vegetation in the vicinity will continue to generate smoke odors and airborne particles when disturbed by air movement.

• It is important to know that every time you open a door some odor from outside will creep into your home. This is inevitable and does not mean that your needs to be re-cleaned.

• It is against most city and state laws to power wash outdoors and without reclaiming the water. If you hire a contractor to power wash the exterior of your home be sure they comply with city and state laws. It is also suggested to wait until after the first good amount of rain. This will help reduce debris still in the air and it will wash off any settled particles from your roof which could re-soil the sides of your house when it does rain.

Additional Tips from FEMA and the American Red Cross

• Launder or dry clean all clothing. Call us if you would like a recommendation to a dry cleaner who specializes in fire damaged clothing

• Launder or dry clean all clothing. Call us if you would like a recommendation to a dry cleaner who specializes in fire damaged clothing

• Wash, dust or otherwise clean all household items, including knick-knacks. Use a bucket to rinse, a bucket with cleaning solution and then rinse. Replace the rinse water frequently and avoid using contaminated water.

• HEPA Vacuum or clean all carpets, window coverings, upholstered furniture and mattresses.

• Upholstery, fabric window treatments, etc. can be spray-treated with deodorizing products available at most supermarkets. Do not use odor masking products

• Have heating, ventilating and air-conditioning units and all ductwork professionally purge or cleaned to remove soot, ash and smoke residue. Change filters to HEPA filters immediately and then consider replacing them every month until the soot and ash outside has subsided by rain or vegetation regrowth.

• If aerial fire retardant or firefighting foam residue is present on the house and/or automobiles, use a mild detergent and brushes to scrub and dilute the dried residue and flush it from the surfaces; rinse with clean water. A follow-up with pressure washing may be beneficial but will not replace scrubbing to remove the residue. Again, be aware of water run-off laws in your area

• Ash and soot on the ground and vegetation in the vicinity will continue to generate smoke odors and airborne particles when disturbed by air movement.

 

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The Summer Heat May Be Affecting Your Home’s Appliances

Appliances in the heat

You know those hot summer days when you can feel the sun sucking away your energy? Well, the same thing can happen to your household appliances during the summer too. When the weather gets hot, there are some preventative measures you can take to protect the systems and appliances in your home.

The higher temperatures outside can create a buildup of moisture on your appliances inside. This extra moisture can cause appliances to degrade faster, and can potentially cause electrical shocks. Appliances can also sweat, causing water to settle around cords and wires. It can also flood the interior of the system, which can potentially lead to mold.

You also must be wary of your appliances overheating. Appliances may have higher surface temperatures, and can lose function when overheated, or require more electricity to work properly. Most appliances use more energy during summer months because they have to work even harder to maintain a cool temperature themselves.

AC Units often have to work harder in the summer because in addition to cooling your home, they also work to remove moisture from the air. Consider installing a dehumidifier with your HVAC system, or using one in rooms where it gets hottest. The dehumidifier can remove moisture from the air and allow the Air Conditioner to work solely on cooling your home.

You should also maintain regular cleaning/maintenance of your unit’s filters and coils in order to ensure that it is working properly. The same should go for your fridge/freezer. Dirty coils can lead to overheating, which could leave you without an AC unit or a fridge.

Your fridge should also be kept somewhere cool (avoid hot garages). Once you find the right place for your fridge, be sure to give it ample breathing room. The fridge needs enough room to release heat, but you don’t want that heat to become trapped and cause the unit to overheat and stop working.

You should maintain regular upkeep and maintenance of all of your household appliances all year long, but it’s especially important to be mindful of how they can be affected in this summer heat. Should you require emergency services, call SERVPRO of Tustin 24/7 at 714-480-1340

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How To Keep Your Pets Safe When There’s A Fire

Approximately 500,000 pets are affected by house fires each year. Many house fires are caused by pets, especially when left home alone. Read over these tips to help prevent any accidental fire started by your pets and for keeping your pets safe in the event there is a fire in your home. Make sure you include your dog, cat, or other pets in your family’s emergency plan.

Pet-Fire850

Prevent Your Pets From Starting A Fire

    • Beware of candles and other open flames. Dogs are curious creatures and may take interest in a flickering flame. If you do have any open flames in your home at any time, be sure to never leave them unattended and to keep an eye on your pets. If you’re using a fireplace, consider getting a fireplace screen to protect pets when sleeping in front of the fire. Also make sure the fire is completely out before heading out or going to bed. Small sparks and coals can get through a screen and result in a fire.
    • Secure wires and cords. Pets are often tempted to chew on loose wires and cords. Exposed wires can be a fire hazard, so consider securing any electrical objects so that their cords are out of reach.
    • Don’t use glass bowls for your pets’ water. When filtered and heated through glass, the sun’s rays can ignite the wood beneath the bowl and set a deck in flames. Try using a stainless steel or ceramic bowl instead.

 

Keep Your Pets Safe After/During A Fire

    • Place a pet fire sticker on the door or window. In the event of a fire when you’re away, having a pet sticker will help rescuers know how many pets to look for, saving valuable time and hopefully your pets.
    • Use monitored smoke detectors. Pets left home alone can’t escape on their own when there’s a fire. Monitored smoke detectors contact emergency responders when you’re not home and add an extra layer of protection beyond that of battery-operated smoke alarms.
    • Keep pets near entrances when you’re away from home. Keep collars (with ID tags) on your pets at all times and leave leashes by the entrance or somewhere easy to find in an emergency. This will help firefighters to find and rescue your pets when they arrive.
    • Know where your pets’ hiding spots are. It’s important that you can find your pets quickly if there’s a fire. Know where your pets like to sleep and especially where they like to go when they are scared or anxious (under the bed or hidden in a quiet corner of the house somewhere)
    • Have an emergency plan in place and make sure everyone in the house knows what to do in the event of a fire. Know who will be in charge of getting your pets outside safely. Have someone in charge of leashes and pet carriers so that they can be safely secured once you’re outside. In the event that you can’t find your pet when exiting, leave doors and windows open on your way out and call to them so that they come out on their own.
    • Practice fire drills with your pets. It is important to include your pets in the family fire drills. Practice finding them and getting out of the house. Also practice the “open access” scenario where you leave an exit open (preferably the one they’re most comfortable with) and call to them to come out of the home. The more you practice, the more likely they are to come out in the event of an actual fire.

Yellow Lab by Fire Place

If you have any questions or require restoration services due to fire damage in your home, call SERVPRO of Tustin at (714)480-1340. Our crews are available 24/7 for services.

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